Mitch McConnell refuses to vote on gun safety bill after 10,000 deaths in 100 days

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The House passed historic gun safety legislation 100 days ago, but McConnell is blocking the Senate from taking any action.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell still refuses to allow a vote on a pair of gun safety bills 100 days after the landmark legislation passed the House of Representatives.

On February 27, the House passed a bipartisan universal background checks bill, the first piece of significant gun safety legislation in a generation. The next day, the House overcame Republican opposition to pass another bill to close the "Charleston loophole," which would make it harder for those with a criminal record to bypass a background check and obtain a gun.

"Our constituents sent us here to do something — and we did," Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-VA) told Shareblue Media.

"100 days ago, leaders who ran on a promise to take action delivered a historic victory for gun safety," former Rep. Gabby Giffords said in a Thursday statement. "Every day since, the House majority continued fighting for stronger gun laws — fighting to make our country a safer place to live, work, study, worship, and play."

Giffords, who was shot eight years ago during an event with constituents, now runs a gun safety advocacy group bearing her name.

Despite overwhelming public support (64% of gun owners agree that the government needs to address gun violence), McConnell continues to engage in an obstructionist agenda.

McConnell's inaction "presents another hurdle," to making America a safer country, Wexton noted. "It's been 100 days with zero action by the Senate Leader. This bill would save lives, yet he allows it to languish on his desk — it's shameless."

McConnell refuses to do anything with the gun safety legislation, even after a dozen people in Virginia Beach were killed in a mass shooting at the end of May. In fact, 10,000 people in America died from gun violence during the 100 days McConnell allowed these bills to languish on his desk.

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT), a leading gun safety advocate, said McConnell's "inaction is complicity."

Gun safety advocates refuse to stop fighting for a safer, less violent America.

"The Senate has yet another opportunity to do the right thing — something their constituents overwhelmingly support — and pass a law requiring a background check on every gun sale," Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action told Shareblue Media. "Polls show more than 90 percent of Americans support closing this loophole in federal law. Every Senator who refuses to act to keep our families and communities safe the should expect to be held accountable."

In her statement, Giffords added that "Americans are watching Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Trump and waiting for them to take the next step. How many more lives will be lost before they sign the background checks bill into law?"

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi took aim at McConnell's do-nothing attitude during her weekly press conference. "We're very proud of the work that we have done to send over to the Senate where Mr. McConnell has said he's the Grim Reaper," she said. "It's a Senate graveyard."

Pelosi was referencing a speech McConnell gave to supporters about blocking legislation moving through the House, where McConnell dubbed himself the "Grim Reaper."

With approximately 100 people dying every day from gun violence, McConnell's description of himself is far too accurate.

Published with permission of The American Independent.