Despite wishful thinking from Mike Pence and friends, Americans support special counsel Robert Mueller, and his investigations are far from finished.

Projecting from inside the White House’s Fox News bubble, Vice President Mike Pence insists “America” wants special counsel Robert Mueller to end his Trump investigation just one year in.

But that’s a frantic lie, as poll after poll has shown Americans support Mueller’s work, and that he had above average approval.

Pence, it seems, is being pushed out front to try to run interference for the Trump White House as it desperately tries to derail the encroaching Russia investigation, which has already announced nearly 20 indictments and is preparing to put Trump’s former campaign manager on trial this summer.

“I think that’s probably an opinion widely shared by people all across America,” Pence told Fox News, referring to his May 10 claim that it was time for Mueller “wrap it up.

The latest Monmouth University poll, from early this month, however, reports that “a majority of Americans (54%) support continuing the special counsel’s Russia probe.”

But Pence is continuing to push GOP talking points. “The truth is it’s been now more than a year…I continue to hope, and to say very respectfully, that the special counsel ought to — with all deliberate means — complete their work, and provide the information to their leadership at the Department of Justice that will come from this investigation, so that we can just simply move on as a country,” he told Fox.

In another piece of bad news for Trump, as he tries to wage a public relations war against law enforcement, is the fact that swing state voters overwhelmingly viewer Mueller as being more trustworthy than Trump.

A May poll found that, “44.7 percent of independents in Florida, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania put more trust in Mueller than they do the president. By comparison, only 25.7 percent of independents believe Trump is more trustworthy,” The Hill reported.

Meanwhile, the fact that Mueller’s team has been working for a year is completely insignificant in terms of trying to depict the probe as going on for too long.

“The 21 major special counsel probes in the post-Watergate era lasted an average of three-and-a-half years from the appointment of an independent counsel to its conclusion,” Politico recently noted.

And in the case of the six-year Whitewater investigation of President Bill Clinton, the first indictments weren’t even filed until two years into the probe.

Pence ought to settle in for a long, bumpy ride.