"We don't know what's credible and what's not. And now everyone is going to come forward."

Insisting he no longer understands what the term “rape” means, Breitbart’s editor in chief, Alex Marlow, claimed that accusers have stripped the word of any meaning and that’s it’s used by women after they “regret” having sex.

“Rape used to have a narrow definition. Rape used to have a definition where it was — it was brutality, it was forced sexual attack and penetration,” said Marlow during a Tuesday morning radio broadcast. “Now it’s become, really, any sex that the woman ends up regretting that she had.”

Wallowing in rape-denial rhetoric, Marlow complained that “guys” are confused about the illegal act because now “everyone is going to come forward” to make the claim:

But you guys can do this in your own mind, where rape used to mean something. We used to all knew what it meant. And then now we don’t know what it means. And then we don’t know what’s credible and what’s not. And now everyone is going to come forward.

By endorsing the idea “rape” no longer has meaning, Marlow is trying to absolve men of any wrongdoing, suggesting women simply use to the term as an act of revenge. It’s a stunning claim for any editor to make — even for one who runs a dumpster site like Breitbart.

Of course, the white nationalist outpost has a long history of rape denial content. When Milo Yiannopoulos wrote for Breitbart before being fired for condoning pedophilia, he routinely claimed sexual assaults were fabricated, in columns such as “Even If You’re Acquitted Of Rape, Feminists Can Still Ruin Your Life,” and “‘Slut’s Remorse’ Is Why Rape Suspects Should be Anonymised.”

Marlow’s claim that men are blameless for rape comes as Steve Bannon’s site runs interference for Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy More, who has been accused of molesting and preying on teenage girls when he was in his 30s. Breitbart editors have been quick to defend Moore’s perverted behavior.

Marlow told Politico that while he never dated teen girls — “That’s not my personal preference,” he said — because the age of consent in Alabama in the 1970s was 16, Moore’s actions weren’t that big a deal. “I’m not here to cast judgment on things that are legal.”

Previously, Breitbart’s Joel Pollak appeared on MSNBC and suggested Moore groping teen girls wasn’t “problematic” because he was a single man at the time.


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