Roy Moore’s campaign came out swinging against the departing communications adviser, blaming him for his lack of experience defending an accused child molester.

The news keeps getting worse and worse for GOP Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore.

Amid accusations from nine women of stalking, sexual assault, and child molestation — as well as calls from some Republican leaders to drop out, polls showing his lead collapsing, and a blistering new attack ad from his Democratic challenger Doug Jones — Moore faced yet another blow on Wednesday.

According to a report from the Washingtonian, Moore’s communications director, John Rogers, has resigned.

But rather than use the departure as a chance for self-reflection, Moore’s campaign came out swinging against Rogers:

It would be rare indeed for a communications director to have “experience” defending a candidate who stands accused of serial pedophilia and who was banned from a mall and the YMCA in his hometown for his predatory behavior. But given that Moore, his wife, and his attorney have held press conferences attacking the accusers and refusing to apologize, Rogers must have made a Herculean effort.

Judging by this response, as far as the campaign is concerned, none of the scandal is Moore’s fault — it is Rogers’ fault, for failing to stop the press from pursuing the story.

Meanwhile, the rest of Moore’s communications team is in complete disarray. Some staffers tried to lie to the press and claim that Rogers was fired rather than resigned. Prior to the announcement of his resignation, one official flat-out told reporters, “Y’all can quit asking us questions.”

The whole affair shows that Moore has no capacity for good judgment or personal responsibility. Anyone who would want to step up and assume his now-vacant communications adviser role would clearly be no better.