Local Democrats are surging while Republicans scramble.

The wheels appear to be falling off for Colorado Republicans this midterm election cycle, and Trump’s not helping as Republicans scramble to blunt the looming losses in November.

Why are Republicans running for cover weeks before election? Probably because Trump’s approval rating among crucial independent voters in the state stands is at a dismal 32 percent, according to a recent poll.

Democrats enjoy a 13-point lead among independent voters when asked which party they want to control Congress next year as well.

The poll also found that 59 percent of Democratic voters are extremely interested in Election Day, compared to 47 percent of Republicans.

Polls are showing Democrats are on the verge of winning the governor’s race — again — and flipping a U.S. House seat, as well as having a good chance of winning the state’s attorney general contest and taking control of the Colorado Senate from GOP the first time in a decade, there’s a lot on the line for Republicans.

The bad taste Trump leaves could help Democrats running in crucial toss-up races for the Colorado Senate, where five campaigns will likely decide which party runs the committees next January.

The Trump disdain could be especially helpful in District 20 where Democrat Jessie Danielson is running against conservative Christine Jensen, who refuses to say where she stands on Trump and his radical agenda. Hillary Clinton won the district by nearly 10 points in 2016.

Another Trump flashpoint could come in District 24, which pits Democratic Faith Winter against Republican Beth Martinez Humenik, who won her seat in 2014 by just 900 votes.

The political terrain has gotten so bad that supporters for one of the state’s staunchest conservatives members of the Colorado Senate, Tim Neville, were recently caught faking an endorsement from the state’s sitting Democratic governor.

How bad is bad? Last week, Vice President Mike Pence flew out to Denver to speak at a luncheon hosted by a conservative super PAC, and when he landed at nearby Buckley Air Force Base, not a single Colorado politician was there to greet him.

Not one.

That only happens when there’s a blue wave sweeping the state.