The allegations against Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore are painful and personal. So why does his wife think they're good news for the White House?

With a smile on her face, Kayla Moore, the wife of Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore, said on Friday that Donald Trump owes a debt of gratitude to her and her husband for deflecting bad news from the White House.

Standing alongside local allies who voiced their support for Moore, who has been accused of preying on teenage girls when he was in his 30s, Kayla Moore seemed to make light of the fact that the hurricane of media coverage around her husband’s scandal had provided political cover for the Trump administration.

“All of the very same people who were attacking President Trump are also attacking us. I personally think he owes us a thank you,” she said.

“Have you noticed you’re not hearing too much about Russia?” she continued. “To the president I would say, ‘Now is a good time to get things done in Congress.'”

It’s a uniquely heartless and insensitive thing to suggest that the horrific stories being painfully recounted by Moore’s accusers somehow represent good news for Trump’s political fortunes.

And it is truly bizarre to suggest that grown women weeping in front of cameras recalling their alleged assaults at the hands of Moore should make the White House happy because they’re temporarily taking attention away from the Russian cancer eating away at Trump’s presidency.

For the record, there is no good angle for the White House, or the Republican Party, when it comes to the disturbing Moore allegations, including the claim he once called a local high school and had a student pulled out of trigonometry class so he could ask her out on a date.

With his own deep history of sexual assault, Trump shows no interest in wading into the Moore story and has been unusually quiet on the hot-button topic. Meanwhile, polls show Moore now trailing his Democratic opponent in a state Trump won by 28 points last year. Losing a senate seat in a deeply red state like Alabama would represent a huge political setback for the White House, which is having monumental trouble passing any legislation through Congress.

And not to disappoint the Moores, but lots of Russia scandal news has been making headlines since the child molestation accusations broke one week ago.

This week, we learned that special counsel Robert Mueller issued a subpoena to Trump’s campaign back in mid-October, marking the first official order for information from Trump campaign officials.

We learned that Donald Trump Jr., was in touch with WikiLeaks during last year’s campaign, as the pro-Russian cut-out tried to coordinate with the Trump campaign regarding the dissemination of the Democratic Party emails that Russia operatives had stolen.

And last weekend, Trump became so unglued by burgeoning Russia investigation that he lashed out at the U.S. intelligence community leaders, who fervently believe Russia interfered with last year’s elections. “I mean, give me a break, they are political hacks,” he whined.

At least they never claimed that a child molestation scandal represented good news.