In two major blows to the Republicans' agenda, their latest proposed health care bill is widely despised, while Americans are embracing young, undocumented immigrants in huge numbers.  

As Republicans limp toward Wednesday’s Senate finish line in their never-ending quest to repeal Obamacare, they’re backing a bill that almost nobody wants or likes.

The health care provider industry and the insurance industry have both resoundingly opposed the Graham-Cassidy bill, which would affect one-sixth of the U.S. economy.

And the public rejects the bill, as well — even most Republican voters.

A paltry 20 percent of Americans support the repeal bill, according to Monday’s CBS News poll. By contrast, when Obamacare was signed into law in 2009, after a yearlong debate and after Republicans blasted the proposal for months, 46 percent of American supported the initiative.

The massive thumbs down on the health care bill comes just two days before Republicans are supposed to vote on it, though by all appearances, the bill seems doomed to fail.

It’s not surprising the GOP’s dreadful bill is so unpopular, given that it’s pushing such a warped agenda.

What is astonishing is how closely GOP lawmakers want to be associated with landmark legislation that is nearly uniformly despised. Only 7 percent of Americans think the Republican health care bill would help them personally, according to the CBS News poll.

And nearly nine in ten of all Americans believe that health insurance companies should be required to provide insurance to people with pre-existing conditions. The Graham-Cassidy bill allows states to obtain waivers from federal government to decide if pre-existing conditions are covered.

That’s another reason just 2 percent (!) of Democratic voters support the bill.

But that overwhelming disdain for the Republican health care initiative actually pales in comparison to the avalanche of opposition to the proposal of deporting undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children.

A new ABC News poll finds that a staggering 86 percent of Americans support the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which was established by President Barack Obama in 2012 via executive order. DACA allows those young undocumented immigrants to stay and work in the U.S. without fear of deportation.

Indeed, the bipartisan results, given today’s hyper-partisan environment in the U.S., are stunning.

From ABC News:

Support spans demographic groups, including three-quarters of Republicans and conservatives, 86 and 87 percent of independents and moderates, and 97 and 96 percent of Democrats and liberals.

Together, the two polls paint a picture of a Republican Party whose goals are opposed on an almost historic scale.

If nothing else, Republicans are helping to unify the country as it comes together in opposition to their heartless agenda.