The year's first publishing sensation has been fueled by Trump's attempt to keep a new book from reaching stores.

If Donald Trump’s goal was to make Michael Wolff’s new book about the Trump White House a publishing sensation, then it’s mission accomplished.

After Trump’s lawyer Charles Harder sent out hopeless legal threat to try to stop the book from being published by the Henry Holt company, the move simply generated even more publicity for “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House.”

The news-making book, based on interviews with Trump friends and advisers, depicts Trump as being utterly incompetent and his team of aides as being completely complicit in what’s depicted as essentially a hoax presidency.

Wolff’s publisher responded to the threats by moving up the official release date of the book from next Tuesday to Friday, and Thursday at midnight eager consumers lined up in hopes of grabbing a copy.

Kramerbooks in Washington, D.C., on a bitterly cold night, sold all of its copies in just 15 minutes.

The book is filled with a laundry list of embarrassing and shocking disclosures about the White House, including the claim from Trump’s former strategist Steve Bannon and the president’s son and son-in-law took part is a “treasonous” meeting with Russian operatives during the 2016 campaign.

But trying to stop the book from being published is a futile move.

History shows that U.S. government officials going to court to try to ban information from being published doesn’t work out very well for them. In fact, Steven Spielberg just made a movie about the time Richard Nixon tried to do that.

Note that Trump attorney Harder “also briefly represented Harvey Weinstein, and threatened on his behalf to sue The New York Times,” CNN reports. No lawsuit was ever filed in that case.

Appearing on Friday’s “Today” show, Wolff was asked about Trump’s attempt to keep his book from being published, the author quipped, “Where do I send the box of chocolates?”


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