On September 17, 2012, David Corn broke the story of an undercover video capturing Mitt Romney disparaging 47 percent of Americans as "entitled" and "dependent." Four years later, Corn caught Trump saying virtually the same thing: "Eventually, the 50 percent cannot carry—and it’s unfair to them—but cannot carry the other 50 percent." Trump's comments take on new meaning with the October surprise about his massive 1995 tax loss.

In light of the New York Times bombshell that Trump may have paid no federal taxes after a massive $916 million deduction in 1995, one has to wonder if he was referring to himself when he claimed that half of Americans are freeloaders.

Speaking to Sean Hannity in 2015, Trump said this:

The problem we have right now—we have a society that sits back and says we don’t have to do anything. Eventually, the 50 percent cannot carry—and it’s unfair to them—but cannot carry the other 50 percent.

He echoed the same sentiment in an interview with MSNBC’s Kasie Hunt:

We have a tremendous amount of people in this country that don’t want to work. They have no inclination to work.

Compare that to what Mitt Romney said in 2012:

There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. All right, there are 47 percent who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you-name-it.

Romney’s comment was a major blow to his campaign. Coverage was immediate and intense. Not so with Trump. Like most of his transgressions, his 50 percent insult was ignored by the corporate media.

Describing half the country as lazy freeloaders would typically land a candidate in an epic mess. Perhaps the revelation that Trump declared a nearly BILLION dollar loss in 1995 and may have used that deduction to avoid taxes for 18 years will revive his “50%” comment.